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April 30, 2016

Point / Counterpoint: Sugar Toxicity

Is sugar toxic?

Here are a few articles fervently supporting this theory…
Time: Sugar is Definitely Toxic
“After nine days of having their total dietary sugar reduced to 10% of their daily calories, however, they showed improvements in all of these measures. Overall, their fasting blood sugar levels dropped by 53%, along with the amount of insulin their bodies produced since insulin is normally needed to break down carbohydrates and sugars. Their triglyceride and LDL levels also declined and, most importantly, they showed less fat in their liver.”

Sugar Science: The Toxic Truth
“There is growing scientific consensus that one of the most common types of sugar,fructose, can be toxic to the liver, just like alcohol.”

Global Healing Center: Refined Sugar: The Sweetest Poison of All
“Refined sugar is lethal when ingested by humans because it provides only that which nutritionists describe as “empty” or “naked” calories. It lacks the natural minerals which are present in the sugar beet or cane.
In addition, sugar is worse than nothing because it drains and leaches the body of precious vitamins and minerals through the demand its digestion, detoxification and elimination makes upon one’s entire system.”

…an analysis…
NYTimes: Is Sugar Toxic?

“If what happens in laboratory rodents also happens in humans, and if we are eating enough sugar to make it happen, then we are in trouble.”

…and a few other points of view:
Stats.org: Glaring Flaws in Sugar Toxicity Study
“Tom Sanders, professor emeritus of nutrition and dietetics at King’s College London, said the study needed to be viewed “with some skepticism” because it was uncontrolled. It did not compare the children with a similar group who continued to eat a high-sugar diet. The comparison instead was made with their weight and health before the study while on their usual diet. “But it is well known that obese children underestimate and under-report food intake, particularly of soft drinks and snack foods,” said Sanders.
‘This is a fundamental flaw in the study. It is likely that the changes in metabolic outcomes observed can be explained by the experimental diet providing fewer calories than the children’s usual intake.'”

The Atlantic: Being Happy with Sugar
“The metabolic effects of fructose presented in ordinary human diets remain poorly investigated and highly controversial.”

Bottom line, it’s probably not great.  Do your research, use your brain, and decide for yourself.

featured image: theatlantic.com

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